Tag Archives: Northwestern

ENGINEERING YOUR PITCH

jockey-and-horse-t-ms-officeInsights from the Cornerstone Angel Meeting

by Stephanie Wiegel

Angel investment deals aren’t made on the spot as the TV show Shark Tank suggests. Instead, entrepreneurs are excused from the meeting after delivering their pitches. If you’re vying for early investment money, what’s said behind these closed doors can make or break a deal. Continue reading

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A NEW LINE OF THOUGHT

The Lean Canvas

John Jonelis

ENURemember when you wrote that 50 page business plan—the one that nobody actually read? Well, you never have to do it again! Now you can put it all on ONE PAGE.

It’s called the BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS, a.k.a. the LEAN CANVAS. It’s fast. It’s visual. It’s a living document. It’s the new tool of choice among startups, big business, and major universities.

I’m at my old school, taking in the big, all-day “entrepreneur@nu” conference and they just handed me the Canvas on a slick clipboard, complete with a dry erase marker. Want to see how it works in 2 minutes? Check out this cool video from the genius that developed the concept:

Here at Northwestern it looks like total commitment. All the departments are teaching the Canvas. This entire event actually feels like walking around the Canvas itself.

This new line of thought originated with Alexander Osterwalder. I remember when it became a huge subject on LinkedIn—people were struggling to find ways to implement his brilliant conception. Then books came out, refinements were made, and software got developed—some by Osterwalder and more by a number of other people like Steve Blank and Ash Maurya.

Everybody’s got a slightly different slant on the details but they all reach the same goal—incredible efficiency and flexibility. Check out the weblinks below. You can find lots more if you look around.

I’ll be back later with more new thinking and just who won all the money at e@nu.

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GO TO PART 2

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enu-conference

Links

e@nu Conference  http://entrepreneur.northwestern.edu/conference/2013/

Alexander Osterwalder – Business Model Canvas www.businessmodelgeneration.com You’ll find the video here.

Steve Blank – Lean Launchpad http://steveblank.com/2012/09/06/the-lean-launchpad-online

Ash Maurya – Lean Canvas http://leancanvas.com/

Forbes – Article on Business Model Canvas www.forbes.com/sites/startupviews/2013/01/28/getting-the-most-out-of-getting-out-of-the-building

Wikipedia – Article on Business Model Canvas http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_Model_Canvas

Photography by Northwestern University

Video from Alexander Osterwalder

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Chicago Venture Magazine is a publication of Nathaniel Press www.ChicagoVentureMagazine.com Comments and re-posts in full or in part are welcomed and encouraged if accompanied by attribution and a web link . This is not investment advice. We do not guarantee accuracy. It’s not our fault if you lose money.
.Copyright © 2013 John Jonelis – All Rights Reserved
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Filed under 1871, angel, angel capital, angel investor, chicago, Chicago Venture Magazine, Chicago Ventures, Education, Entrepreneur, Entrepreneurship, Events, Impact Engine, Innovation, Invention, investor, Kellogg, Northwestern, Software

THE TWO WHEELS OF CHANGE

Impact Engine – Part 2

VERBATIM by Loop Lonagan – Investor and man about town,

as told to John Jonelis

Impact EngineLoop Lonagan here at IMPACT ENGINE Investor Day. This is the new Chicago incubator fer companies that do well by doin’ good—and doin’ it profitably! Think of it—we’re gathered here to get richer by makin’ all them other poor slobs around the world prosper! This I like!

The keynote speaker is FK Day. (He calls hisself  FK fer short.) And he tells us a story that knocks us outa our seats. This is a real unusual chain of events that speaks about the virtues of capitalism doing alotta good by helping folks raise their own well-being.

Buffalo Bicycles

Here’s the shortlist:

  • The story starts with SRAM that makes high-end bike parts.
  • Then FK starts World Bicycle Relief—a not-fer-profit.
  • That leads to Buffalo Bicycles—a self-sustaining company.

Impact Investing

The Chase Auditorium’s packed with serious investors. Them’s the only kind they let in the place today and this hall seats over 500 of them rascals. They’s all squealin’ ‘n’ squirmin’ to get a piece o’ the action. Sheesh—I ain’t seen so much money in one room since I…well I ain’t s’posed to talk about that so lemme move on. I’m here to do summa that Impact Investing, just like da rest o’ these clowns. But first lemme get back to the keynote speaker

(Note to Editor—All that coffee I swilled down‘s got my eyes buggin’ out ‘n’ I feel a whole lot more coherent. I’m gonna give you the skinny on this thing. But I want you should cut me some slack—just in case I get something out o’ order.)

(Editor’s Note—Nobody’s perfect. I’ll print it just as you dictate it.)

Okay, so dis story starts after FK pioneers bicycle shifters ‘n’ brakes at SRAM. His stuff’s in high-end bikes AND in all the big international races. Even poor disgraced Lance Armstrong uses SRAM components so you gotta figure that FK knows a thing or two about bikes.

Hey—this is a Chicago company, okay? Don’t get no better ‘n’ that, right? Well actually it does as you’ll see in uno momento.

Bicycles WBR 1

World Bicycle Relief

Remember that big tsunami in Indonesia? FK and his wife go there to lend a hand. They’re lookin’ for a better solution than the NGO relief organizations. So they asks people lotsa questions.

Turns out nobody can earn a living or make any economic progress ‘cause there’s no transportation. Everybody’s on foot. That ain’t too efficient. There’s kids spendin’ six hours a day walkin’ to school ‘n’ back. Mothers carryin’ groceries long distance. And get this—businesmen haulin’ their wares to market 5 or 10 miles on foot.

You think da rush hour here in Chicago eats into yer day? It’s nothin’ compared to this. This is no way to do business. This keeps folks in poverty.

The Power of Bicycles 3

FK’s a bike guy, so he shows up pre-loaded with the natural solution to the problem. He runs experiments and finds out alotta things. Turns out a bicycle can increase the income of a poor family in a big way. Looks like it’s the single best way to fight poverty in these primitive areas.

So he creates the not-fer-profit organization, World Bicycle Relief, which is a real big deal. They partner with WorldVision and alotta other organizations.  They give out 24,400 bicycles in Indonesia.

Bicycles WBR 2

Africa

FK starts a buncha 9-day trips to Zambia to fight HIV/AIDS and creates a special bike for it. Bicycles WBR 10

His folks first task is to assemble their bikes so’s they can get around. Their last task, before they leave, is to turn over their bikes to the villagers.

Bicycles WBR 9 FEELING GOOD

FK gives out 90,000 bicycles this way and learns a lot more about the problem.

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By now he’s got three well-defined areas he wants to impact:

  • Education
  • Healthcare
  • Economic development

Bicycles WBR 3

I think education tugs at him strongest.  Kids in these countries gotta travel a real long way to school and still have time to do chores not to mention homework.  With bicycles, they can get to school more often.  That builds up the whole culture by givin’ these people a future.  Givin’ ’em hope.  Summa these folks wanna be teachers, doctors, engineers.  Somethin’ as simple as a bicycle can make that happen.

Lemme get you started with a terrific video. Have a look at it ‘n’ then I’ll tell you more.

Pretty good stuff, doncha think? Bottom line—bikes carry more weight farther and faster than shoes. Bikes get kids to school, people to clinics, and they get businessmen to markets!

Bicycles WBR 11

FK tells the story of a dairy farmer in Zambia. With a bike, he can get to the co-op twice a day insteada just once.

That instantaneously doubles his income! 

Summa these guys mount homemade cargo boxes on these bikes and use ‘em like trucks.

Bicycles WBR 6

According to FK, the most powerful bike in the world is one in the hands of a mudder feedin’ her family or a fadder making a buck fer his family or a kid gettin’ an education to claw his way outa poverty. All o’ these takes transportation. And education is real important. You gotta learn readin’, ‘rightin’, and ‘rithmetic and how to speak yer language da right way or yer never gettin’ nowhere in dis here world.

Bicycles WBR 7

Buffalo Bicycles

Lemme go back to the hardware development phase. FK takes this jeep trip down them things called roads in Zambia. Whadaya think he sees? Busted bikes in the ditches ever’place he goes—every brand ‘n’ model on the planet. Says it looks like somthin’ outa The Andromeda Strain. (That’s a movie in case you fergot.)

Bicycles WBR 8These bikes come from well-meaning charities. But it’s all wasted. People in Zambia take to callin’ ‘em Chinese Junks. Off-the-shelf bikes is way too flimsy fer this kinda terrain.

So whadaya think the average lifespan is for yer typical off-the-shelf bike? 30 days! That’s it! And there’s no way to fix ‘em neither! Too many different brands. No parts. No mechanics.

FK figures what they need:

  • Standardized bicycle
  • Standardized parts
  • Real, real rugged
  • Trained mechanics
  • Supply Chain

Bicycles WBR 14 THE BIKE

The Buffalo Bicycle is a rugged design like no other. It can withstand rough roads while carrying a load o’ trade goods to market.

Here’s a video of FK in Africa riding the roads with folks:

Da Business

Charity’s a good thing.  But how do ya make it self-sustaining?  How do ya make it grow like a hockey stick?  You turn it into a business.  Business can be a helluvalot more powerful than an outstretched hand.  A little capitalism can be good fer da soul and FK’s a capitalist at heart.  

FK sells the Buffalo Bicycle to third-world businessmen at a profit.  That makes the project self-sustaining.  He trains and supplies mechanics.  And that maintenance network is self-sustaining too. So far they got 124,754 bikes out there where they can do some good. 

He shows us graphs ‘n’ charts. He’s gonna be building 100,000 bicycles in eight African-based supply chains in 2015.  This program is scalable and sustainable.

Bikes from website 2

Remember all that research I told you about? FK makes a key point about that. He learned everything he ever needed to know from the end user. We need to stay deeply in touch with these people. The answers almost always come from there.

Bicycles WBR 13 Wrigley FieldAnd to me, the amazing thing is that he went and figured out da problem and da solution ‘n’ engineered such a wonderful outcome.  He bootstrapped all o’ this starting with lotsa fund-raising drives like the annual Wrigley Field Road Tour which is a part of Chicago Cubs Charities. 

Here’s a candid video of FK thanking his volunteers after a small fundraising drive–one of many:

Next up is a company called ThinkCERCA. Meanwhile, check out summa the other articles about Buffalo Bicycles below.  Ω

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CONTINUE TO PART 3

Go back to Part 1

More Reading

Wrigley Field Road Tour

http://worldbicyclerelief.org/pages/wrigley-field-road-tour

World Bicycle Relief on Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Bicycle_Relief

Article in Forbes

http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2010/0510/creative-giving-sram-zambia-charity-armstrong-bicycle-economy.html

BBC Article in TON

http://timesofnews.co/2012/03/15/can-the-buffalo-change-africas-bicycle-culture/

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Da Contacts

FK Day

FK Day

World Bicycle Relief website  http://worldbicyclerelief.org

WBR on Facebook  www.facebook.com/worldbicyclerelief

SRAM Logo

SRAM Corp.  http://www.sram.com/

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IMPACT ENGINE website  www.TheImpactEngine.com

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[ Photos and video courtesy of World Bicycle Relief ]

Impact Engine

Chicago Venture Magazine is a publication of Nathaniel Press www.ChicagoVentureMagazine.com Comments and re-posts in full or in part are welcomed and encouraged if accompanied by attribution and a web link . This is not investment advice. We do not guarantee accuracy. It’s not our fault if you lose money.

.Copyright © 2013 John Jonelis – All Rights Reserved

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Filed under 1871, angel, angel capital, angel investor, big money, Characters, chicago, Chicago Venture Magazine, Chicago Ventures, CORE Insight Story, Economics, Entrepreneur, Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship and Politics, Impact Engine, Impact Investing, Innovation, Innovation and Culture, Invention, investor, Kellogg, loop lonagan, Social Entrepreneur, vc, venture capital

THE NEW NORMAL

The Chicago Innovation Awards – Part 2

John Jonelis

Time Share Gulfstream JetI’m on Loren Bukkett’s Gulfstream G450 trying to squeeze an interview out of him. “I asked you about the mayor and the governor but I didn’t get a response. What about it?”

“There are plenty of real businesses that won real awards. Let’s talk about those.”

“Okay, what did you think of the pre-show?”

He slouches in his leather chair. “I slipped in quiet-like. Why not give me your impressions?”

Once again, he’s turning the tables on me. But I close my eyes and bring up the picture in my mind. “I get there early. I’m in the lobby and it gets louder and louder. 1,500 people hitting the portable bars and yammering at each other.”

I check to see if he’s listening. I should know better. This guy misses nothing. “So I’m sitting on a bench, ignoring the throng. I turn to the fellow beside me and it’s my marketing professor, Phillip Kotler.  Haven’t seen him in 20 years.”

Philip Kotler

Philip Kotler

Loren looks comfortable and satisfied. “That man wrote something like 50 books and I’ve read every one of them.”

That’s a lot of reading.  I think back to a time when Kotler drove a Ford Taurus and loved it while his students traveled in Beemers and Benzes. They couldn’t figure him out. And there’s something he said to our class at Kellogg that I’ve never gotten out of my head. ‘It’s not your job to satisfy your customers,’ he said as the students dropped their jaws. Then he went on: ‘It’s your job to DELIGHT your customers!’ He doesn’t take credit for the line.  Now, in this economy, students are graduating college with no jobs. So the school shifts focus. Northwestern is teaching them to start businesses. And they’re succeeding at it. It’s the new normal.

Snifter of HennessyLoren pours us each a huge snifter of Hennessey VSOP.

I inhale the rich aroma. It goes down nice and helps loosen my tongue. “This crowd is completely different than I expect. Dressed to the nines—some in tuxedos. But they let me in the door anyway and call me ‘sir.’”

He gives a sneer of distaste. “I hate that ‘sir’ talk.”

So do I.  “By the way, it turns out Kotler’s on the board of advisors for this event. He introduces me to Tom Kuczmarski who moderates with Dan Miller. These guys founded The Chicago Innovation Awards twelve years ago.”

“Just give me the meat of it.”

I can do that. “First thing that surprises me—the pizzazz—lots of loud, lively music and entertainment. Like the academy awards on steroids. Then Tom Kuczmarski and Dan Miller get introduced with a promise to take them out of their comfort zone. And that’s what happens—big time.”

Loren leans back and lifts his cowboy boots to the table. “Risk taking is the only way you get innovation.”

“Yeah, that’s the way I heard it. Then they’re in a video skit. It’s a reality show—kinda like American Idol. They’re competing with the The FootworKINGz. 

The FootworKINGz

The FootworKINGz – jaj

“This is a group that dances in tightly choreographed rapid rhythmic jerks—moves taken from the streets of Chicago. And they’re sensational. Tom and Dan do a magic act but those dancers are a tough act to follow. It turns into a nightmare. That sleazebag Howard Stern leads a panel of judges. At least I think that’s who it is. They all gang up on Tom & Dan and their magic act. They criticize it and cut it to pieces.”

Loren sips his cognac and nods. “Like a presentation before investors.”

I see the connection and grin. “So Tom passes a hula hoop over Dan and suddenly he’s undressed to his boxer shorts.”

Loren smacks his lips. “Just like going through due diligence.”

“Then he shrinks Dan to the size of a baby and the guy squawks like a parakeet.”

Loren passes his snifter under his nose. “Man’s ego always gets in the way.”

“Then the judges give absurd advice about how to improve the act.”

“Expert coaching,” he says.

It occurs to me that Loren got a lot more out of this thing than I did. “Then Tom and Dan decide, ‘If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.’ And they perform on the live stage with The FootworKINGz.”

“You don’t need classical training to be a success. Sometimes it holds you back.”

“You saw all this yourself, Loren. I’m supposed to interview you.”

Hennessy VSOP Cognac

Hennessy VSOP Cognac
– image from Wikipedia

He smiles. “You just did, John. You just did.”

I feel like he taught me a lesson of some kind but I can’t quite put my finger on it.

His phone rings and he checks the screen. “Gotta take this call.” And I sit and wait. From what I can make out, he’s talking to some staffer that’s buying up shares of tonight’s companies. Finally he pockets the phone and sips his Hennessy. “Let’s get down to the real businesses that won real awards.”

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Continue to Part 3

Go back to Part 1

Comment on this article –Your name and email is optional

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Find Chicago Venture Magazine at www.ChicagoVentureMagazine.com Comments and re-posts are welcomed and encouraged. This is not investment advice – do your own due diligence. I cannot guarantee accuracy but I give you my best.
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Copyright © 2012 John Jonelis – All Rights Reserved

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THE GROUPON EFFECT – “Throw yourself into the fire”

Throw Yourself into the FireVERBATIM – Transcribed recording from Bill Blaire – as told to John Jonelis

This is Bill Blaire reporting on the keynote event at the Second Annual “entrepreneur @ nu” Conference.  Why they call it that, I dunno.  No capital letters.  So how come everybody complains about the way I talk?  You figure it out.

I’m here with John but he told me I should cover the big interview myself.  Pretty good, huh?   Well we’re gonna give it a shot.  Hope this gizmo’s recording my voice, ‘cause I ain’t gonna memorize this stuff.  That’s fer sure.

They open a wall and make the room bigger but the place is still packed.  I’m sitting with a crowd from the Levy entrepreneur group, so I gotta keep my voice down.  If I get any of this wrong, just write a comment and let me know about it.

The setup seems kinda strange.  It’s Andrew Mason from Groupon interviewed by his own VC, Peter Barris of NEA, who’s also on his board.  Kinda chummy to my way o’ thinking.  Barris is a smooth talker.  Makes me wonder which one of ‘ems really the boss.  He sez there’s gonna be two sets of questions.  Puffball and deeply embarrassing.  We’ll see.

Groupon

Turns out Andrew Mason starts college in engineering then transfers to music. Barris points out, “The best and most creative programmers were music majors.  I haven’t yet figured that out.”  Me neither but I heard it in other places too.  In college, Mason holds fake auditions for a fake play.  Then he stages a fake annual university event called ‘Mattress Day,’ where everybody brings their own mattress and they create the tallest stack.  He quotes Ben Franklin as saying he sees mattresses all the way from Chicago—as if there were a Chicago back then.  (Hey—check out that subjunctive verb.  Yeah, I can do that.)  The school shut Mattress Day down good ‘n hard, but he had a great time.  I guess the point is you gotta be playful and ready to take risks to succeed at this startup game.

Mason goes through a long trail of failed startups but keeps trying.  He loves music and he’s a computer geek—started building websites in high school.  It’s not till he graduates from Northwestern and he’s recording music and working as a freelance developer at the same time when he discovers that the Internet is a more wide-open creative space than music.  Not so congested with talent.

According to Mason, “I always assumed that people who developed companies were vastly smarter than me but I found out that’s just not true.”  So does he mean he’s smart or the other guys are dumb?  I give him the benefit of the doubt and call him an egalitarian.  (Hey—I can spout three-dollar words with the rest of ‘em.)

He gets, an idea for a website called Policy Tree and gets a scholarship to the University of Chicago to learn public policy.  Then in after few months o’ school he gets this idea for a different website and drops out to start a company called THE POINT.  Turns out a cell phone company wants to charge him 150 bucks to cancel their service.  That after being a loyal customer for five years. He figures a lot of people must be having the same problem.  “I wanted to make it possible for people to come together to accomplish something that no one of them could accomplish alone.  Because people’s ideas aren’t coordinated, they can’t cross the finish line.  I needed a way to coordinate a lot of people with the same problem.”  So that one idea grows from an irritation to an actual company, kinda like a tumor, I guess.

Barris’ boss hates THE POINT.  Sez it’s the worst idea he heard in 35 years in the VC business.  But he likes Mason’s enthusiasm so he invests in it anyway.  Sounds like another example of a jockey who’s more important than the horse.  That make any sense to you?   We can argue it out later.

The problem with THE POINT is it’s too abstract—too hard to explain to people.  As he put it, “How do you convince people that the idea matters to them personally?  It turns out that the best ideas are just a baby step away from something that already exists.”  Another problem—if the idea isn’t tangible, it’s hard to find other backers.  He wasn’t gonna be able to fund every good idea he planned.  Does he quit?  No, he picks the best element—the one that’s easiest to explain—and starts Groupon.  Barris made a good call after all.

Mason: “Groupon snuck up on us.  So many companies wanted it that I knew I must be solving a problem.”  He finds out that local businesses don’t have a good way to reach their local customers and that’s the pain point he works on.  Merchants have TV, radio, newspaper—traditional stuff—all expensive, all paid up-front whether it works or not.  So this solves a consumer problem and a merchant problem, too.

GROWING PAINS
Groupon takes off big time like everybody and his mother knows.  Forbes calls it “The fastest growing company in history.”  Meanwhile, Mason faces his biggest challenge.  He never managed people before.  Now he’s got 12,000 employees.  He used to write code, design stuff, and personally answer customer calls.  That just don’t scale.  Now he’s gotta delegate, build teams, set goals to keep those teams aligned—it’s a big role change.  Think about it.  Amazon is in 9 or 10 countries in 15 years.  Groupon is in 43 or so in just a few months.  According to Mason:  “Going public has been a stress test.  It forced us to get stronger.”

Mason calls Groupon an operating system for commerce.  Their biggest problem?  “When it works too well it’s like concentrated detergent—when you put too much in…  Merchants get too many customers—a completely new problem that they’ve never had to deal with and we’ve had to adjust our operations to solve it.”  Hey, that’s the kinda suffering I can get comfortable with.

New ideas?  Lots of ‘em.  Now 30% of their sales are mobile.  They’re test marketing a pull strategy where you say, hey, I’m hungry.  Where can I get a good rack o’ ribs?  And you go on the mobile Internet and find a deal.  That’s different from their email push strategy.

This year, I been hearing a lotta startups say they’re gonna be better than Groupon because of this or that dingus they offer.  Turns out it’s harder than people figure and Groupon’s not done inventing itself either.  These people are very smart.  And as Mason tells it, it’s a very intense business that needs a lotta operational excellence.  As he puts it, “We built our moat inside the castle walls.  People get up to the walls and say, ‘Sweet.’  But once they get inside they find out there’s a big scary moat and all the gold’s on the other side.”  That’s brings up a great picture in my mind and tells me all I need to know about the barriers to entry.

Groupon
COMPANY CULTURE

People read stories like them hiring a guy dressed in ballerina outfit to walk around the grounds for a week without talking to anybody.  Then when Mayor Bloomberg comes, they got a pony in the office.  Mason doesn’t think about culture that way.  “Culture as the element that helps get work done.  And that has to get stronger as we grow.”  So they hire entrepreneurs.  They give ‘em goals but also the freedom to pursue those goals the way they want.  That approach has launched a bunch of new business segments.  Hard to compete with a big and fast-growing company that acts like that.  Reminds me of Google.  Anybody agree with me?

Has Groupon contributed to the growth of entrepreneurship in Chicago?  Mason doesn’t feel comfortable with the question but when Barris asks the audience, everybody shouts out “Yes.”  Myself, I think Groupon is the biggest morale-booster this city ever saw.  Entrepreneurship is exploding here because of one spectacular success.  Finally Mason answers the question. “We couldn’t have built Groupon in Silicon Valley.  Hundreds of our customer service people have come out of the Second City improv tradition.   We solve problems using people—not always technology and self-service which is the bias in Silicon Valley.  In Palo Alto you get a lot of mission driven people who are good at the one thing they do.  And the cost of an engineer has tripled.  Chicago has just as much talent.”  Amen to that, brother.

The universities in Chicago are teaching entrepreneurship big time these days.  Three important messages:

1.) It’s okay to fail. 
2.) Be persistent.
3.) Surround yourself with other talented people. 

Mason wishes there was more entrepreneurship training when he went to school.  “I learned more in an internship on music technology—actually doing things—than I ever learned in class.  Throw yourself into the fire.  Go to a company and offer yourself cheap or for free so you get a lot of latitude to fail.”

Q&A

How will they stay ahead?  He wants to be the operating system of ecommerce and talks about how all their new ideas support each other.

Is there a social media bubble?  Not compared to the 90’s.

Does Groupon do social good like THE POINT meant to do?  They’re making things possible for millions of people.  Companies have grown because of it.  That’s business enabling business—a nice slant on the do-gooders.

How do you isolate Groupon employees from media criticism?   “The employees know what’s really going on in the company so they have thick skin and stay focused on long term while this new industry is being built.”

AFTERWARDS
John takes me for a walk around campus.  Beautiful place. No wonder he went to school here.  But they’re tearing down parking lots to make more buildings.  Digging up others to make green space.  Those numbers don’t add up.  I dunno if I believe this but John claims he avoids campus events any more.  After a long drive he gets a rhino boot on his car. This time they sell a parking pass online, so he shows up.

We stop at the Allen Center and run into the Wildcat Angels just starting a meeting.  I like that group.  After grabbing some refreshments, we go down the halls.  Funny thing:  The gift shop is open and John buys one o’ them silver cases holds business cards.  Real class, too—sez ‘Kellogg’ on it.  Never had one before.  But he can’t wrangle a Kellogg nametag lanyard.  Go figure.

Find Northwestern’s entrepreneur program at http://entrepreneur.northwestern.edu/
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GO TO – SIX REASONS WHY TECH BELONGS TO THE YOUNG

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Find Chicago Venture Magazine at
www.ChicagoVentureMagazine.com
Comments and re-posts are welcomed and encouraged. This is not investment advice – do your own due diligence. I cannot guarantee accuracy but I give you my best.

Copyright © 2012 John Jonelis – All Rights Reserved.

46 Comments

Filed under Chicago Venture Magazine, Chicago Ventures, Kellogg, Northwestern