Category Archives: Global Cleantech Cluster Association

TWENTY QUESTIONS YOU WILL BE ASKED BY VENTURE CAPITALISTS

(If You Get That Far)

Logo Tby Laurence K  Hayward

Most likely you’ve played the game 20 questions. As the contestant, you use your best combination of questions, which can be answered with a simple “yes” or “no,” in order to discover a piece of information held secret by the other player. The objective is to discover the unknown information with the fewest questions (from the 20 you’re allotted), as quickly as possible.

This game shares some common traits with a venture capital interview. As the interviewee, you can expect a barrage of questions. You might also feel like the interviewers are trying to box you in as they narrow the choices, in order to hone in on the “answer” as quickly as possible. Recognizing that venture capitalists reject a far greater number of deals than they accept, the quickest way for this interviewer to finish the game is to find a fatal flaw, a deal-killer, a quick “no.”

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A key difference between the game “20 questions” and the venture capital interview is that you, the interviewee, don’t get to answer the questions with a simple “yes” or “no.” So, in order to help you prepare, outlined below are 20 questions that venture capitalists most frequently ask entrepreneurs. Following each, I’ve included a brief explanation regarding what the venture capitalist (VC) might be trying to uncover. These questions aren’t necessarily in the order you would receive them, though the winnowing process was taken into consideration when creating this list.

 

1 – What is the market potential for your company’s product or service? What is the revenue potential for the industry, and what is its growth rate?

The VC wants to quickly ascertain whether the opportunity is large enough to pursue. What determines if the opportunity is large enough? Typically, it hinges on whether the VC will be able to achieve a target return within the designated timeframe (often three to five years). While all firms have different investment criteria, most VCs target a minimum internal rate of return (IRR) of 25 percent and many seek IRRs higher than 50 percent. To reach these thresholds, VCs look for companies with considerable market potential for their products or services (often $500 million, $1 billion or more). They prefer growing markets to retrenching ones. Also, most VCs focus on specific industries, so they’ll be trying to ascertain whether this deal is within their bailiwick.

 

2 – How did you calculate market potential? How do you determine industry sales and growth rate?

It is common for entrepreneurs to include very large market potential figures in their business plans and then indicate that they require only a miniscule fraction (e.g. one percent) of the market to achieve their projections. These figures are often suspect and lead to a rolling back of the eyes of the would-be investor. Further, VCs often prefer opportunities that capture a larger fraction of a target market segment otherwise its value may be questionable relative to the competition. Market potential should be verified by independent research as well as bottom-up and top-down calculations.

 

3 – What makes your business different or unique?

This question can have two wrong answers. A business can be both too common and too unique for a particular investor. If it’s too common, the VC will be concerned with the competition and the lifecycle of the business. If it’s too unique, the VC might be concerned with the time required to achieve critical mass. Many truly revolutionary products require educating the marketplace, and that can be an uncertain and lengthy undertaking. There is a saying that VCs prefer evolutionary over revolutionary businesses.

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compulsion

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4 – Why would someone be “compelled” to purchase your product or service? What specific needs does it address?

Venture capitalists look for businesses with products or services that address a demonstrable market need or demand. Is your product something the buyer needs? Or is it just something that would be nice to have? If it falls in the latter category, then it is critical to demonstrate how your product will gain traction, that is, how people will come to demand it based on market trends.

 

5 – How do you know that your business has high-growth potential?

Venture capitalists want to know how you “drew down” your revenue estimates from the market potential figures (which hopefully include estimates from external sources). Ultimately, they want to see a large growth opportunity that scales quickly, thereby allowing them to realize the payoff on their investment as soon as possible. Be prepared to explain in detail the process you used to estimate revenues and how/why they scale.

 

6 – What is it about your management team that makes them uniquely capable of executing on this business plan?

You’ve probably heard that the three most important items in private equity investing are management, management and management. More specifically, VCs are typically looking for management with experience in building a business (or comparable), deep expertise with the technology or industry product, and strong character. What comprises the latter? VCs look for managers who demonstrate high energy or passion, resourcefulness, integrity, perseverance, risk-taking ability and pure mental horsepower. A frequently overlooked quality is that of humility – understanding one’s limitations, the need for teammates with complementary skills and the ability to listen.

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Risk

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7 – What are the primary risks facing this opportunity?

Most people tend to think of “the competition” when people ask them about risks facing their business opportunity. However, competition is only one risk. Other risks include changes or shift in technology, governmental and regulatory policies, labor market conditions (availability to find qualified labor at a reasonable cost), business climate changes, product liability, computer crime, etc. And, don’t forget financial risks. For example, what happens if your capitalization doesn’t allow you to reach breakeven or your next financing event? A risk assessment of potential threats to your business can help you prepare for the scrutiny of investors.

 

8 – Who are your competitors?

You’ve heard the warning “never say never.” When answering the above question, the warning might well be “never say none.” There is more to this question than may first be evident. Certainly, VCs are interested in learning about the competition your business will encounter and how you will distinguish your company. But, they also might be assessing your maturity as a businessperson. The answer “none” is typically incorrect because your business almost always has at least two competitors. Potential buyers could simply continue to function without your product (e.g. through the use of a substitute, however less effective) or buyers could “do nothing” (e.g. choose not to utilize the product or service). Furthermore, if the investor is aware of competitors that you have not considered (as many have researched particular segments independently), he or she will lose faith in your business assessment skills – so be prepared.

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competitive advantage

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9 – What gives your company a competitive advantage?

Venture capitalists want to know how you plan to outmaneuver the competition –and this doesn’t just pertain to existing competitors. They want to see that you’ve given thought to future market entrants and how you will stave them off. “First-mover advantage” is rarely a sufficient response to this question. A more effective answer usually depicts intellectual property barriers or the ability to reach the target market in a way that is more effective than the competition. What is unique about your company that gives it an edge?

 

10 – Does the company have proprietary intellectual property in the form of patent, trademarks, copyrights, etc.?

What do you own? What can you protect? These are two important questions on the mind of any VC. In some industries (e.g. biotech), patents play a critical role in protecting the research and development investments of the company and in helping to ensure that there is a window of opportunity (usually before competitor offerings arrive) for the company to realize a significant share of revenues for a particular category. Trademarks and copyrights are critical to protecting the company’s intellectual assets and its “brand.” Also, at some point, VCs will also want to ensure that you’ve taken the proper steps (through non-disclosure agreements, non-competes, and/or employment agreements) to ensure that the company is protecting its intellectual capital.

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patent pending

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11 – When will your company break even in terms of profitability and cash flow?

Remember when you first became financially independent of your parents? Hopefully, you were at a point where your income exceeded your expenses and you no longer required their support. The concept here is similar. Once you’re financially independent, you’re also less of a liability. Of course, the ultimate goal is to reach an exit scenario quickly. Profitable businesses are more attractive to potential buyers or public markets.

 

12 – How do you plan to acquire customers?

A well-developed business plan includes marketing strategies that demonstrate an understanding of market realities and customer behavior. VCs are looking for much more than a list of your marketing initiatives. You can anticipate questions like: What are your company’s customer acquisition costs? Have you calculated average and target revenue per customer? Do you know how many customers are required to break even? Do you know the product sales cycle?

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13 – How do you plan to keep customers?

The most successful companies seem to have a plan for keeping customers –even before they acquire them. It is said that it costs five times as much to generate business from new customers as it does from existing customers. Customer retention is critical to long-term success.

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14 – What drives customer satisfaction for this industry and for the product? And, how do you know?

Have you conducted research in order to assess what is truly important to your customers? Do you know what product features are critical vs. those that are ancillary? Once you’ve acquired customers, you’ll need processes to ensure their ongoing satisfaction and your understanding of their changing needs. Have you considered how you’re going to support the product and the expenses associated with such support? Will existing customers purchase your product or service again? Will they recommend it to others? Regular and consistent customer feedback is essential in order to obtain the answers to these types of questions.

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15 – Who is the end user of the product or service offering?

Is this a consumer-based business, or will you sell your product or service to other businesses? What do you know about the demand for your product or service in that target market? What do you know about the buying habits of your target market? Do you anticipate any roadblocks? For example, will you have to educate the buyer? Also, give thought to how you can leverage partners or re-sellers to reach your target markets. Knowing the answers to these questions will be critical when you speak to a VC about your opportunity.

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team

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16 – What alliances or partnerships have you entered?

(e.g. joint ventures, marketing alliances, licensing arrangements, selling/distribution agreements, channel partnerships, software agreements, etc.)

It is important to remember that alliances can be assets and liabilities. Venture capitalists will want to know if any of your alliance agreements have compromised your intellectual property claims and if the company has any outstanding obligations to third parties. On the positive side, you’ll want to demonstrate how alliances may have helped your company lock -up certain distribution or sales channels for your products and services. Do any of your alliances give you a competitive advantage? Do they create barriers to entry? Do they help you reach customers more efficiently?

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17 – What is the anticipated lifecycle of your product or service offering? What are your current and future plans for R&D investment?

All great things come to an end. Products mature, competitors offer substitutes and customers demand change. Have you anticipated when the earnings power of your product will run its course –for first-time buyers as well as for follow-on sales to existing customers (e.g. upgrades)? What are your plans for R&D investment, and how will you continue to generate revenues when existing products run their course?

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child workers

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18 – How do you plan to expand your labor force?

While the precise conditions of labor markets change, it is always a challenge to find the best people. Venture capitalists will not only be interested in the composition of your existing workforce, but also in how you plan to fill key positions now and in the future. Have you used an executive search firm? Do you have qualified candidates currently under review? How will you compensate people, so as to attract, motivate, and retain employees, while keeping labor costs under control?  What does your option program look like?

 

19 – What are the probable exit scenarios?

Venture capitalists need to know how they’re going to monetize their investment, hopefully at an ROI of 50 percent or more. As an entrepreneur, you should spend some time thinking about who could acquire your business down the road. Be both realistic (particularly on timing and valuation) and creative regarding M&A possibilities.

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20 – What is the planned “Use of Proceeds”?

Venture capitalists want to know that their money is being put to good use in order to directly accelerate the business opportunity, so that they will receive their ROI in a timely fashion. One “no-no” is using VC investments to service existing debt obligations. Be prepared to present a timeline of milestones. Include a breakdown of how the money will be spent and what it will allow you to accomplish..

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Adapted from the Journal of the Heartland Angels  news.heartlandangels.com

This article is a summary of a larger article. The full 15-page article may be obtained by contacting VentureLab. ©2014 VentureLab, Inc. All rights reserved.  www.theventurelab.com

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About the Author

Larry Hayward 2Laurence K. Hayward is a founding partner of Independence Equity, an early-stage venture fund launched in 2011.  The fund is actively investing having recently completed its 8th investment.  He is co-founder of Cornerstone Angels, a network of accredited investors that has invested in 40 companies since 2006.  He is also founder/CEO of VentureLab, an organization that has been launching new ventures since 2002.  Previously, he was President of Vcapital.com, an internet start-up that matched entrepreneurs with investors, acquired in 2002.  Hayward has been forming, investing in and advising start-ups since 1999 following 8 years at Arthur Andersen in the Emerging Company Services practice.  He is a graduate of the Joint MBA/BS program at the University of Illinois in Champaign Urbana and hold Series 7 and 63 licenses.

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Image Credits

Wikimedia – 1954 DuMont Television/Rosen Studios, New York, MS Office Clip Art

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Chicago Venture Magazine is a publication of Nathaniel Press www.ChicagoVentureMagazine.com Comments and re-posts in full or in part are welcomed and encouraged if accompanied by attribution and a web link. This is not investment advice. We do not guarantee accuracy. It’s not our fault if you lose money.

.Copyright © 2015 John Jonelis – All Rights Reserved

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Filed under angel, angel capital, angel investor, big money, Chicago Venture Magazine, Chicago Ventures, Entrepreneur, Entrepreneurship, Global Cleantech Cluster Association, Heartland Angels, Heartland Mobile Council

CLEANTECH COMPETITION

Impact Engine—Part 7

VERBATIM by Loop Lonagan – Investor and man about town,

as told to John Jonelis

Claire Tramm - Effortless Energy TLoop Lonagan here with a real simple story. I’m at the CHICAGO CLEANTECH COMPETITION watchin’ ten green companies go head-to-head for the chance to move on to the international GCCA contest.

Hey, dis old world needs a good scrubbin’, doncha think? I’m here, trying to use my natural greed on somethin’ constructive fer a change. I glance around and see a company I know has da potential. We’re gonna hear some good stuff.

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Effortless Energy Logo

Claire Tramm CEO

Lemme ask you a question:

Elec MeterIf you could make your house energy efficient with no effort and get paid to do it, would you?

Effortless Energy is planning to make that happen. Here’s their offer:

  • Their experts figure out what your house needs. Then they find the contractors and do the work. You just sit back ‘n’ sip yer beer.
  • They pay for everything. They add insulation, plug air leaks—all the stuff that makes yer house comfortable and cheaper to live in. Effortless Energy 35 percent
  • Then they split the energy savings with you.
  • You get a nicer house, more money in your pocket every month, and you don’t plunk down any up-front money at all—nada.

With an offer like that, who wants to rob their bank account or take out a loan? Who Claire Tramm - Effortless Energy 2wants to wait years fer da payback? Who wants to go through the hassle o’ hiring alotta contractors? This makes me smile, ‘cause now I ain’t gotta do them things no more.

And yer helpin’ the environment by doin’ it! Inefficient houses is a big part o’ da carbon footprint and there’s 120 million in the USA. Hey, that’s a $230 Billion opportunity fer Effortless Energy! This one looks like a winner to me!

Effortless Energy Home GraphicI hear talk and read stuff—all kindsa complicated explanations about what they do, but it’s really a no-brainer. I got an old house. I want to work with these people. Don’t you?

Have a look-see at their video:

So’s I listen to nine other presentations. Some sound pretty terrific. Others don’t look like real companies. Now the distinguished judges is leavin’ to select the winners. Will they pick the best ones? Don’t make me laugh.

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Strange Goings On

The judges is leavin’ to vote on the winners and the audience just moved to the feeding trough. So I’m just sittin’ there when one judge—this delicate oriental lady—hangs back and asks Rong Mayhem to give back her business card. To me that shows good judgement.

But Rong holds it outa reach and asks, “Why do you put PhD at the end of your name?” Sheesh! I mean, why do you suppose? After summore o’ that kinda behavior, she stamps her foot and insists.

His response? “I’m gonna have to put you in my doghouse. That’s for people who give me trouble.” Actually, he used a different word than doghouse, but I can’t say that here.

So I finally speak up: “Rong, she hasta go do the judging. You wanna keep us here all night?” So he hands it over and things get back to normal for a while. Sometimes strange things happen at these events. It don’t bother me none and it’s kinda fun to watch.

When da judges finally file back in, they pick some pretty good companies, but my favorite ain’t one of ‘em. But who can tell what’ll happen when these ventures hit the real world? Here’s all of ‘em and da skinny on what they do:

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Da Competitors

Software to drive energy efficiency in industrial buildings with alerts.

Wind generator using a venturi to increase safety and efficiency.

Synthetic diesel and jet fuel from garbage.

More efficient hot water solar panel using a mirror.

  • Greenlight5th Place

Smart Meter for consumer electricity savings.

Make your house energy-efficient for free and get paid for it.

Pelletized torrefied wood to replace coal in power plants.

  • Kriisa Research

Reliable and stable portable energy fer developing countries.

  • Chicago Nat Gas Tanks

Custom low-pressure tanks to carry nat-gas using NuMat MOF technology.

  • Community Retrofits (participated via Skype)

Just like Effortless Energy, but for entire community associations.

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Da Judges

From readin’ the stuff on these judges, I get the impression they ain’t the kinda tree-huggin’ folk I expected:

  • Ben BrownClean Energy TrustExpert on energy systems. Commercializes renewable energy with alotta hands-on experience.
  • K. Quentin Burchill Jr.—Angott Search GroupTrack record fer matching energy companies with the right investment firms. Another hands-on guy.
  • Barbara A Fatina, CPA, MBA—Argonne National LaboratoryDeputy CFO at Argonne and big business. Energy operations experience. She builds businesses and teams.
  • Jared Gonsky—LanzaTechGroups businesses on a global scale. Experience in ethanol, VC work, marketing and supply chain in big business.
  • Diana Y Hu, PhDMolecular physicist and Biophysicist. University of Chicago MBA. Education of foreign-born professionals and clean energy.
  • Philip M Martin—United AirlinesFinance, development, operations, process—especially in transportation. University of Chicago MBA, which counts fer a lot with me.
  • Mark Menarik—UltraCarbonSerial entrepreneur in tech, alternative energy and nano materials. Focuses on cleantech scale-ups.
  • Travis Narum—Acciona EnergyWind and solar energy expert. West Point grad, and that ain’t nothin’ to sneeze at.
  • Anthony F Toussaint PhD, MBA—DSM Functional MaterialsChemical industries expert. R&D in fiber optics. PhD Chemical Engineering, University of London. Kellogg MBA, which gets top marks from me.
  • Klaus Voss—BW IndiaLong-time entrepreneur in environmental energy and biotechnology. Commercialized bio-wastewater tech for Mexico, India, and the ASEAN community. Another hands-on guy.

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Da Organizations

Dis thing is put on by some good folks:

One of over 50 global clusters responsible for nominating companies eachChicago Clean Energy Alliance logo year for the Global Cleantech Cluster Association’s Later Stage Awards competition.

They connect cleantech companies globally to create value chains. They seek GCCAcompanies that are scalable, equity investible, and willing to take risks. Their ten 2011 winners raised $462 Million.

Northwestern University – Kellogg School of Management accelerator located Impact Enginewithin the 1871 incubator. Linda Darragh’s baby.  Focus on social entrepreneurship.

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Photos and Video courtesy of Impact Engine, Effortless Energy, Chicago Clean Energy Alliance, and GCCA.

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GO BACK TO PART 1

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Chicago Venture Magazine is a publication of Nathaniel Press www.ChicagoVentureMagazine.com Comments and re-posts in full or in part are welcomed and encouraged if accompanied by attribution and a web link . This is not investment advice. We do not guarantee accuracy. It’s not our fault if you lose money.

.Copyright © 2013 John Jonelis – All Rights Reserved

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Filed under 1871, angel, angel capital, angel investor, big money, Chicago Clean Energy Alliance, Chicago Ventures, Cleantech, Entrepreneur, Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship and Politics, Events, GCCA, Global Cleantech Cluster Association, Impact Engine, Impact Investing, Innovation, Innovation and Culture, Invention, investor, Kellogg, loop lonagan, new companies, Northwestern, Social Entrepreneur, University of Chicago

WHAT’S CLEAN

Impact Engine – Part 6

VERBATIM by Loop Lonagan – Investor and man about town,

as told to John Jonelis

PortaPure WaterChildLoop Lonagan here. I’m at a place where my natural greed ‘n’ avarice can do some good fer dis poor worn-out world. This is the Chicago CleanTech Competition—what you might call a race between high-tech global janitorial services. Ten distinguished judges will pick the best o’ da best—companies that’re really doin’ somethin’ to deal with the mess we’re makin’ outa our little corner o’ God’s creation. What we got here is da last ten finalists in our great city and tonight that gets cut down to five.

Every one o’ these companies is a specialist with a different slant on how to get the job Chicago Clean Energy Alliance logodone. You know as well as I do—the only company that succeeds in this world is the one that makes good business sense. But are those the ones that’ll win? Probably not. But we’ll see.

The MC makes sure we know today is Earth Day, which gets a shrug all around. Then he explains how the winners move on to the big international GCCA event and compete with companies from Europe ‘n’ Asia. You heard all about that organization, right? If you didn’t, see the link and the video at da bottom. I got no time to explain.

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A Strange Encounter

Lemme give you summa da local color. Things is movin’ along real nice when I hear this harsh voice all the way from the other side o’ the room. He’s yellin’ at an elderly gentleman for nodding off during the meeting. Then he turns his foghorn on me: “Hey Lonagan, are you going to be writing this up? Because I’m going to call you every hour on the hour till you do!”

Sheesh, I ain’t kiddin’. The guy blares that out right in the middle o’ da meeting in fronta all these gentle souls. I’m wonderin’ if any of them clean tech folks ever ran into anybody like Rong Mayhem before.

I know that Rong singled me out ‘cause of a simple misunderstanding. He thinks I’m some kinda reporter. Well, this ain’t no newspaper and nobody sticks me with no deadline. I’m lookin’ for companies to invest in. So’s I keep takin’ notes.

Then he howls. “Lonagan, what the hell are you doing?”

This time I answer. “Just writin’ down what you say, Rong.”

But he’s got a come-back to that: “You know what you are? You’re a legend in your own mind!” Then he repeats it a couple times.

Impact EngineAfter that, things quiet down for a while. And I’m smiling to myself, thinking about the poor MC tryin’ to control the meeting. So I glance over the program and get a jolt. Outa these ten companies, I see two graduates from Northwestern University’s Impact Engine. Lemme tell you about one o’ them:

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Portapure

Portapure George PageGeorge Page is the founder of Portapure and he’s da keynote speaker tonight. He’s also one o’ da judges, so maybe things’ll work out all right after all. He’s a chemical engineer that worked in Chicago water projects so he’s a practical guy. And he’s on a mission. He wants to make clean water available to anybody, anywhere, anytime. To do that, he makes water filtration affordable for the developing world.

Portapure won this event last year and ended up among the top 30 in the world. I first seen him at BNC Venture Capital when he invented a pocket size water purifier. I’ll tell you about that one first:

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Pocket Pure

Picture this: Say yer goin’ into the jungles of Haiti to do disaster relief. Yer gonna be

Dirty water

Dirty water

there for weeks and the water is mostly muddy streams and swamps. This is da 3rd World. There ain’t no EPA out there to slap people with fines fer makin’ a mess. Still, you gotta get yer butt out there no matter what the conditions. So whaddaya do? Pack in lotsa fresh water, right? Think again. Got any idea how many pounds a few gallons o’ water weighs? It’s impossible to lug all that with you. Airdrop it, maybe? Not a practical solution.

As it turns out, you don’t even need to carry a canteen. Instead, you take along a little pocket-size device called PocketPure. It weighs next to nothin’. Any time you get thirsty, you stop at a convenient swamp and make yerself some clean drinking water—one cup at a time. You can stay in the field as long as you want ‘n’ you never run outa water.

Gathering water in a swamp

Up till now, all anybody had was water purification tablets. Those take half an hour to work and you still gotta filter out the dirt somehow. But technology moves forward and you might as well take advantage of it. As you might’ve guessed, Portapure is sellin’ these things to NGOs by the boxful.

Drinking water is in short supply across the world. Lotsa people in all kindsa places die of E. coli and such. Kids even. That brings me to Portapure’s next product:

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Pure Lives

Purtapure Purelives

Purtapure Purelives

This one’s on a bigger scale. It’s a three-phase filter with a 5-gallon capacity—just right for yer typical grass hut. Hey—people in the developing world want clean water for their families, too.

This thing filters both bacteria and viruses outa real filthy water. I’m talking real nasty critters like cholera, typhoid, amoebic dysentery, E. coli, coliform bacteria, cryptosporidium, streptococcus, salmonella, giardia, and of course, yer ordinary dirt ‘n’ sediment—it’s enough t’ make yer flesh crawl. This device filters out 99.99% o’ that muck—the definition of clean water according to the World Health Organization. And the filter lasts for maybe 10,000 gallons! This thing was tested in an NSF certified lab and reduced the E. coli count from 5490 to less than 1.

Muddy waters

Muddy waters

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Da Business

This keeps getting better. He sells these things to NGOs, but there’s another angle. Clean water’s at a real premium. It’s like liquid gold in some places. And folks livin’ there wanna make a living just like anybody else. That gives Portapure a natural distribution network and a sustainable solution that pays for itself. At the same time, they’re putting people to work and boosting the economy in these far-flung places.

.PortaPure WaterChild

Da Awards

This company’s got its share of ‘em:

  • Impact Engine graduate
  • GCCA Global Top 30 company
  • Chicago Innovation Awards 2011 Up & Comer
  • Office of the Treasurer Small 2012 Business Plan finalist
  • Tech Cocktail 2011 Finalist

Here’s a good video on Portapure:


I wanna tell you ‘bout the other companies and who won. But I ain’t got room to do it justice here, so I’ll be back with more.

GO TO PART 7

GO TO PART 1

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Meanwhile, here’s a video that explains the whole international competition:

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Da Contacts

Portapurewww.portapure.com

Contact – Info@PortAPure.com – 773 251 5779

1507 E 53rd. St, Suite 218PortaPure logo

Chicago, IL. 60615

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Portapure on 5 NBC Chicago

PortAPure’s George Page is Saving the World

http://www.nbcchicago.com/blogs/inc-well/Portapures-George-Page-is-Saving-the-World-132243943.html

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Portapure on Crain’s Chicago Business

http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20120823/BLOGS06/120829905/seeing-promise-in-water-purification

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Impact EngineImpact Engine

www.theimpactengine.com

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Chicago Clean Energy Alliance

www.theccea.org

.Chicago Clean Energy Alliance logo

GCCA—Global Cleantech Cluster Association

Their ten 2011 winners raised $462 Million.GCCA

www.globalcleantech.org/

Images and video courtesy Portapure, CCEA, GCCA, Impact Engine, and AP.

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Chicago Venture Magazine is a publication of Nathaniel Press www.ChicagoVentureMagazine.com Comments and re-posts in full or in part are welcomed and encouraged if accompanied by attribution and a web link . This is not investment advice. We do not guarantee accuracy. It’s not our fault if you lose money.

.Copyright © 2013 John Jonelis – All Rights Reserved

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3 Comments

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